South Side Art Crawl | Pittsburgh | Slideshows | Pittsburgh City Paper

June 21, 2016 Slideshows » News+Features

South Side Art Crawl 

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Photo by Stephen Caruso
Leslee Susan Gremba, a South Side resident, is inspired by scenes from city life. In front of her are repurposed bricks she’s used as canvases for paintings of Pittsburgh row houses. “I like to think I’m saving the environment,” Gremba says.
Photo by Stephen Caruso
Kathy Rickard has no formal training, but creates art because she “just really wanted to see if I could do it.” She claims the tent in front of her will be her “future home.”
Photo by Stephen Caruso
Rickard shows off one of her prints, done right after David Bowie died. She aimed for a 1970s-esque design in black and white because she “just can’t work with color right now.”
Photo by Stephen Caruso
Greensburg resident Mary Kokoska has been painting for 25 years for her own pleasure. She is a social worker by trade.
Photo by Stephen Caruso
Sibel Yalin just moved to Pittsburgh from New York City. She holds a pair of goggles made by her standmate, Shane Martin. Yalin works mostly with leather.
Photo by Stephen Caruso
Will Sanders, a Pittsburgh resident, admires a stand’s artwork. “You should charge admission just to look at these,” he says. While Sanders didn’t end up purchasing anything, many happy new art-collectors strolled past.
Photo by Stephen Caruso
Shannon Drudy, who lives in Avalon, works under the name “Shanny Lizz.”
Photo by Stephen Caruso
Lizz took nine months off painting after moving to New York City to manage a gallery; when she returned to the medium, she got rid of her brushes.
Photo by Stephen Caruso
Lizz likes to draw inspiration from nature and what exists around her, even the mundane. “If I see a yellow bush, I’ll remember that,” Lizz says.
Photo by Stephen Caruso
“Taking away the brushes was like therapy.” — Shanny Lizz
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Photo by Stephen Caruso
Members of the art collective Anonamyss goof around in the street — the main inspiration for their art.
Photo by Stephen Caruso
“We try to make everyone who buys our art to be part of our family ... and create something.” — Anonamyss
Photo by Stephen Caruso
Steve Pearce talks with some friends near his table, where some of his paintings are on display. Of painting, Pearce says, “It’s the only thing I want to do.”
Photo by Stephen Caruso
On “Peace through Vandalism,” Pearce tried to burn the paper to get an authentic look. “I started to burn it, to give it the char, but the smoke detector went off, so I decided to just paint it.”
Photo by Stephen Caruso
Michael Scheirer, a Mount Washington resident, works on a large painting of Pittsburgh.
Photo by Stephen Caruso
“It’s a passion of mine to make things.” — Michael Scheirer
Photo by Stephen Caruso
Alex Sadlo, left, and Kari Bray Miller, right, are members of Pittsburgh Flow Collective. They meet every Sunday in Schenley Park to flow jam, which can include hulu hoops, juggling and poi.
Photo by Stephen Caruso
“I got bored in winter in Pittsburgh, so I went out and made a hulu hoop.” — Kari Bray Miller
Photo by Stephen Caruso
The Turkish folk band Ishtar (from left to right, Jeff Chmielarski, Andrea Commisso, Melissa Murphey and Michael Zemko) perform on 12th Street.
Photo by Stephen Caruso
Sadlo and Bray Miller flow jam with their hulu hoops to Ishtar’s beat.
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Photo by Stephen Caruso
Murphey has been playing music with her bandmate Chmielarski for 10 years.
Photo by Stephen Caruso
James Brown has been painting since he was 5. He recalls that his first painting was of Spider-Man and Venom.
Photo by Stephen Caruso
Brown tries to limit his subject matter; his main goal is to “try and make people smile.”
Photo by Stephen Caruso
Sean Coffey paints in the streets. He runs a design studio in Edgewood.
Photo by Stephen Caruso
IncoGuido is in his first year at the art crawl. He found out about it through Art All Night last year.
Photo by Stephen Caruso
Nijay Scarbrbough, age 10, gets her face painted at the Art Crawl.
Photo by Stephen Caruso
Gregory Garay stares intently as he works. Garay moved to Pittsburgh six years ago from New York City after attending the New York Institute of Technology. He has just finished an artist residency at Café con Leche and Most Wanted Fine Art Gallery.
Photo by Stephen Caruso
Garay likes to combine his and others’ experiences into “dreamscape” pieces.
Photo by Stephen Caruso
Dog Ears, a folk-punk artist who has been playing for a year, performs “Anarchy of Dirt,” by Pat the Bunny, who is one of his big influences.
Photo by Stephen Caruso
Zachary Carbaugh, a homeless resident of Pittsburgh, draws with chalk on the sidewalk. He takes art classes at Wellsprings, where his teacher told him about the Art Crawl. “I decided to give back to the community,” he says.
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Photo by Stephen Caruso
Leslee Susan Gremba, a South Side resident, is inspired by scenes from city life. In front of her are repurposed bricks she’s used as canvases for paintings of Pittsburgh row houses. “I like to think I’m saving the environment,” Gremba says.

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