Five Minutes in Food History | Food + Drink | Pittsburgh City Paper

Five Minutes in Food History: The Mai Tai

What kind of rum was the Mai Tai originally made from?
This week on Five Minutes in Food History, bartender Max Stein, of Hidden Harbor, is back to deliver more tiki history with the origins of the Mai Tai cocktail. Attention, food history nerds: Celine is taking a couple weeks off to gather more material and rest up, but in the meantime, you should revisit previous episodes of Sound Bite and Five Minutes In Food History.

Liberty Poles, Excise Tax and Rebellion: Part Three

Ellen Hough, of Liberty Pole Spirits, recounts the story of the Whiskey Rebellion
As Americans began to move west after the Revolutionary War, Pittsburgh became a last outpost of civilization before travelers boarded boats on the Ohio River. Distillers produced whiskey to trade with the newcomers in exchange for staples.

Liberty Poles, Excise Tax and Rebellion: Part Two

Ellen Hough, of Liberty Pole Spirits, recounts the story of the Whiskey Rebellion.
The United States developed its first army to march on tax-evading distillers.

Liberty Poles, Excise Tax and Rebellion

Ellen Hough, of Liberty Pole Spirits, recounts the story of the Whiskey Rebellion
As Americans began to move west after the Revolutionary War, Pittsburgh became a last outpost of civilization before travelers boarded boats on the Ohio River. Distillers produced whiskey to trade with the newcomers in exchange for staples.

Dancing with the Green Fairy: Part Two

How did the destruction of Europe’s vineyards lead the rise of absinthe?
The mystery shrouding this jade-colored spirit has intrigued drinkers for hundreds of years. Fascination spurred imitation, often with subpar ingredients, which contributed to the dangerous reputation absinthe acquired.

Dancing With the Green Fairy: Part One

Cecil Usher guides us through the history and mystery of dancing with the green fairy
Since the 1700s, absinthe, the emerald-colored herbal spirit, has captured the collective imagination. From its beginnings as a medicine to the height of its popularity among artists like Vincent Van Gogh and Mary Shelley, its true effects and mysterious origins have been shrouded in a veil of misunderstanding.

The Bitter Truth

This week, Five Minutes in Food History explores bitters with Wigle Whiskey’s Jill Steiner
Most alcohols started out life as medicines peddled as cures for common ailments. Today, we have a robust bar culture that uses them as cheer-giving intoxicants.

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