Art exhibit canceled after dispute over boycott of Israel | Pittsburgh | Slideshows | Pittsburgh City Paper

June 10, 2014 Slideshows » News+Features

Art exhibit canceled after dispute over boycott of Israel 

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Photo courtesy of Tom Little.
Bashar Alhroub with his work “Diamond Land,” made of broken glass. The map on the wall depicts Palestine.
Still from a video installation by Manal Mahamid. The video depicts the artist “harvesting” rubber bullets off the ground beneath an olive tree. In the foreground are actual rubber bullets.
Another still from Mahamid’s video installation, this one depicting the Israeli-built “separation wall” between Israel and Palestine.
Manal Mahamid with her video installation.
Photo courtesy of Tom Little.
Mohammed Mussallam’s “Gaza in the 21st Century.” The installation work references the rolling blackouts in the artist’s hometown.
Photo courtesy of Tom Little.
Mohammed Mussallam’s “Without Rambling.” The trowel is in the shape of Palestine.
Photo courtesy of Tom Little.
Mussallam with his work.
Photo courtesy of Tom Little.
A still from “Quench,” a video loop by Susanne Slavick and Andrew Ellis Johnson. The video superimposes images of the shoreline on the sectioned, Israeli-built “separation wall” between Israel and Palestine.
Photo courtesy of Dror Yaron
Dror Yaron’s photograph of Daoud Nassar of Tent of Nations, a peace project located on the 100-acre Nassar family farm near Bethlehem. In the foreground are portraits of his ancestors. The Nassar family purchased this land in 1916. On May 19, 2013, the Israeli military bulldozed and destroyed between 1,500 and 2,000 mature, fruit-bearing apricot and apple trees and grape vines on the Nassar family farm, along with the terraced land. Tent of Nations operates by the motto, “We Refuse to Be Enemies,” hosting international visitors and volunteers, offering activities for local youth, and running educational projects for women in a nearby village.
Photo courtesy of Tom Little.
Dror Yaron's installation work "Tea Table." The radio would have allowed visitors to "tune in" portions of a political discussion between the Sites of Passage artists and students at Al-Quds University, in the West Bank. The playing cards include quotes from the conversation.
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Still from a video installation by Manal Mahamid. The video depicts the artist “harvesting” rubber bullets off the ground beneath an olive tree. In the foreground are actual rubber bullets.

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