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Friday, May 20, 2016

Posted By on Fri, May 20, 2016 at 12:00 PM

Here's what's been going down in Pittsburgh:


1. Planned Parenthood
says it will spend $30 million this election cycle, and this past weekend it trained more 1,000 volunteers from across the country at its two-day "Power of Pink" conference held in Pittsburgh. The event trained members on community organizing, media strategies and engaging the public on issues of reproductive and women's health in the months leading up to the election.

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SCREEN CAPTURE FROM @ALTHISTORIES TWITTER ACCOUNT
Screen capture from @AltHistories twitter account

2. The tiny house in Garfield popped up on Airbnb at least twice over the past month. Some are questioning whether advertising the house as a bed and breakfast conflicts with public money the project has received from the Urban Redevelopment Authority. “Posting it on Airbnb could lead one to believe that her using it as a bed and breakfast may be occurring more than occasionally,” wrote Rick Swartz, of the Bloomfield-Garfield Corp., to CP after the first Airbnb posting two weeks ago. “I don't think the URA would accept this, and could conceivably require the developer, cityLab, to repay the $49,000 in URA funds that the project received.”

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PHOTO BY REBECCA NUTTALL
Photo by Rebecca Nuttall
3. Pittsburgh Public Schools has selected its new superintendent. Anthony Hamlet, formerly of Palm Beach County's school district, brings more than a decade of experience as a teacher and principal for both alternative learning institutions and suburban schools. In his current role he serves as director of school-transformation accountability. (He also played professional football for the Seattle Seahawks and Indianapolis Colts.) Hamlet will replace retiring Superintendent Linda Lane, who has led the district since 2010. 

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PHOTO COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH
Photo courtesy of University of Pittsburgh
4. Terrace Hayes, the well-known Pittsburgh-based poet, has snagged another high honor. He received both an American Academy of Arts and Letters award in literature — he's in good company with the other winners, including Ta-Nehisi Coates, author of Between the World and Me — and, most recently, election into the venerable American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Hayes won the National Book Award in 2010 and was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship "genius grant" in 2014. In 2015, his most recent collection, How to Be Drawn, was a finalist for both the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award.

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PHOTO BY RYAN DETO
Photo by Ryan Deto
5. The Allegheny County Jail Health Justice Project is launching a documentation campaign in response to more than 20 complaints they say they've received from inmates and their families. “The ACJ Health Justice Project has continued to receive stories of severe medical neglect and abuse at the Allegheny County Jail, even after the supposed county takeover of health care in September of last year. People incarcerated at the ACJ go weeks if not months without the medication they need to survive and be well," says ACJ Health Justice Project member TeOnna Ross. Project organizers say they are looking to compile more than 200 stories of neglect and abuse at the jail. County officials say they met with the advocates months ago and asked them for documentation of alleged claims, but the advocates were unable to provide them.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHAEL SAHAIDA
Photo courtesy of Michael Sahaida
6. The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra will be live-streaming a concert from Berlin this Sunday — their first ever public simulcast at Heinz Hall and on their website. “[The Berlin Philharmonic has] an incredible technical set-up there which is equivalent to the Met broadcast from the Metropolitan Opera,” says Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra President Melia Tourangeau. “So what we’re doing is basically taking advantage of that system and doing a live feed of the concert back to Heinz Hall in real time. It will be as if you’re sitting in Berlin watching the Pittsburgh Symphony.” 

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On our podcast:
click to enlarge WAYNOVISION
WaynoVision
Hear the man behind WaynoVision on our podcast this week. Wayno talks to us about his sense of humor and his process for illustrating WaynoVision, which we began featuring in City Paper's print edition this week.

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Behind-the-scenes:

PHOTO COURTESY OF PETER MORSILLO
Photo courtesy of Peter Morsillo
Meet City Paper's Summer Guide cover artist Emily Traynor in our Q&A. Traynor talks to us about her whimsical style and her favorite neighborhoods in Pittsburgh.

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On our music blog:

Every week on our FFW music blog, we make a Spotify playlist containing tracks from artists mentioned in the current music section. Listen below!



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From the pages of our print edition:

It's that time again — Summer Guide time! Check it out for listings of music, film, arts, theater, kids' activities, outdoor adventures, and fairs and festivals. (If you picked up the print edition, color the Summer Guide picture on page 64, and send a photo to PghCityPaper on Snapchat for a chance to win a City Paper prize pack.)

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This week in City Paper history:

In 2009, City Paper caused quite the stir with its "Mon-Monkeys" Summer Guide cover. Artist Mario Zucca drew the cover, based on the ads in the backs of old comic books that sold Sea Monkeys — underwater creatures that could be “trained to do tricks” and “entertain.” Our spoof instructed readers that for $2.50, plus $1.50 shipping and handling, they could get a Mon-Monkey starter kit by sending the money and order form to the Allegheny Conference on Community Development. (Our spoof was so obviously fake that we thought nobody could mistake it for a real product. After all, we said these creatures could be trained to wave tiny towels above their heads and vote for members of the Zappala family.) Not only did we receive inquiries at City Paper offices about ordering the creatures, but the ACCD received several order forms in the mail that included real checks for a fake product. Two weeks later, CP issued a clarification under the headline: “Mon-Monkeys do not exist.” Read more about what happened this week in City Paper history.

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Happy snapping!





Editor's note: This post has been updated to include news about the Allegheny County Jail Health Justice Project, as well as the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra.

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Friday, May 13, 2016

Posted By on Fri, May 13, 2016 at 1:24 PM

What's been going down in Pittsburgh this week:

1. City Paper won seven Golden Quill awards on Thursday night during the Press Club of Western Pennsylvania's annual awards dinner. Staff writers Rebecca Nuttall and Ryan Deto captured best-in-show honors for their continuing coverage of Pittsburgh's affordable housing crisis. In all, CP received 13 nominations.

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WAYNOVISION
WaynoVision
2. City Paper will have two new features in its print edition starting Wednesday, May 18. Contributor Nick Keppler will debut a feature called “Weird Pittsburgh,” focusing on regional news that’s odd, strange, bizarre, unbelievable and, well, weird. The new page will also include “WaynoVision,” GoComics’ witty — and wacky — online cartoon panel by Pittsburgh-based cartoonist Wayno. Read more about both contributors in a press release CP issued this week.

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PHOTO BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS
Photo by Luke Thor Travis
3. The Pittsburgh Penguins beat the Washington Capitols in overtime on Tuesday night, advancing to the conference finals. We captured these images of dedicated Pens fans who attended the Tuesday afternoon rally in Market Square.

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PHOTO BY BILL O'DRISCOLL
Photo by Bill O'Driscoll
4. Pittsburgh Filmmakers' firing of three employees last week came to light. Among those fired was Gary Kaboly, who for decades has programmed Filmmakers’ movie theaters and its Three Rivers Film Festival. The lay-offs were about “putting the right people in place to move the organization forward,” interim executive director Pete Mendes told City Paper's Bill O'Driscoll. 

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PGH PAPER STREETS
PGH Paper Streets
5. The city's development boom is now being mapped. Patrick Doyle, a public-radio reporter and adjunct professor at the University of Pittsburgh, created an independent project to map as many city developments as he can. It is called PGH Paper Streets, and is named after streets that exist only on maps. The map shows what many have already expected about development in the city: The neighborhoods with the highest concentration of development projects are Downtown, the Strip District, Lawrenceville and the East End. “I really want it to be a research tool for the average Pittsburgher,” says Doyle. 

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PHOTO BY BILL O'DRISCOLL
Photo by Bill O'Driscoll
6. City of Asylum/Pittsburgh announced this week that plans for its new headquarters — which will include a restaurant, bookstore and event space — are just months away from completion. The new space, named Alphabet City, will be located in the North Side’s former Masonic Building (right next to the landmark former Garden Theater) and is a $12.2 million renovation of the building. Some 150 programs are already planned in the first year of operation.

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On our podcast:


This week on the City Paper podcast, music editor Margaret Welsh talks about her foray into children’s Christian music, and her role on her church’s album You Are My God: Kids Sing Psalms!

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On our music blog:

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST
Photo courtesy of the artist
On our FFW music blog this week, music editor Margaret Welsh reviews Lauryn Hill's Pittsburgh appearance on May 11. Welsh writes: "Wearing a flamboyant red, ruffled jumpsuit, Hill ruled the stage, which was crowded with a full band, including a horn section and three backup singers. In light of her rough PR week, the opener, “I Gotta Find Peace of Mind,” felt especially poignant and showcased Hill’s profound gift for turning raw expressions of human frailness into something bordering on sacred." 

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From the pages of our print edition:

PHOTO BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS
Photo by Luke Thor Travis
This week staff writer Ryan Deto explores the growing Latino community in Pittsburgh's South Hills neighborhoods. According to U.S. Census figures, Beechview has the largest percentage of Latinos in the region at 6 percent (about 500 people); Allegheny County’s Hispanic population is only 1.7 percent (about 21,000 residents). Since 2010, the county has added 3,000 Latino residents. “Hispanics are the biggest minority [group] in the country, but we don’t exist here. It is a small population, but it is growing. Why not take advantage of that momentum?” Pittsburgh Hispanic Development Corporation Executive Director Victor Diaz told City Paper. Leer en Espanol.

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This week in City Paper history:


The 2013 Pittsburgh mayoral primary between Mayor Luke Ravenstahl, Bill Peduto, Michael Lamb and former state Auditor General Jack Wagner was shaping up as one for the ages. But despite a host of new scandals — a slush fund in the police department and a federal investigation of Ravenstahl's administration, for starters — many pundits questioned whether Ravensthal could be defeated. After all, he’d been doing stupid crap for years — using a Homeland Security SUV to go see a Toby Keith concert, hanging out with Snoop Dogg at the Super Bowl and playing the do-you-know-who-the-fuck-I-am card to get into a private event featuring Tiger Woods. But in February, the mayor, who wasn’t showing up for work much at this point anyway, announced he wouldn’t be continuing his campaign. CP’s original plan for our May 8 issue was to do a Luke Ravenstahl cover, but now he was gone. Not ones to back down from a challenge, we did it anyway. The result was Vince Dorse’s hilarious illustration featuring Snoop, Luke and that much maligned SUV. Read more about what happened this week in City Paper history.

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Extra! Extra!

We're now on Snapchat. Follow us by using the snapcode above or by username. Happy snapping!

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Friday, May 6, 2016

Posted By on Fri, May 6, 2016 at 11:36 AM

What's going down in Pittsburgh:

click to enlarge PHOTO BY RYAN DETO
Photo by Ryan Deto
1. The Department of City Planning is looking for volunteers for its second annual CountPGH event. The counting sessions will happen at 36 intersections across the city; volunteers will count bicyclists and pedestrians. A post on Pittsburgh’s Bike and Pedestrian Facebook page highlights the need for these counting days: “This is incredibly important. These numbers help us plan new bike/ped investments and also help us show that our efforts to construct better biking and walking facilities are making a difference throughout the city.”

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2. Port Authority 
officially launched its Spanish-language ad campaign this week. Billboards and bus-shelter posters featuring the ads will soon be featured in the areas with the highest concentration of Latinos: Oakland, Brookline and Beechview. The authority also hopes to launch other non-English campaign ads soon, potentially creating ads for Indic languages, Chinese, Japanese and languages spoken by the East African community.

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3. Pittsburgh Foundation's Day of Giving returned this past Tuesday — a day on which the public can donate to more than 850 local nonprofits and in many cases have their funds matched. However, a glitch in the fundraising technology platform cut the day short, "severely disrupt[ing] the ability of tens of thousands of donors to complete transactions on coordinating organizations’ websites," according to a statement released by the Pittsburgh Foundation. "We look forward to re-scheduling this event as soon as possible to provide our region with a charitable online donation experience that is worthy of the record-setting generous spirit," wrote the foundation's CEO Maxwell King. A new date was not specified. According to the release, in its six years, the Day of Giving has raised $40 million for area nonprofits.

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Sen. Pat Toomey is against the nomination of Judge Merrick Garland to the U.S. Supreme Court - OFFICIAL UNITED STATES SENATE PORTRAIT
Official United States Senate Portrait
Sen. Pat Toomey is against the nomination of Judge Merrick Garland to the U.S. Supreme Court

4.  Law experts in Pittsburgh this week argued that the Senate's refusal to act on the nomination of Judge Merrick Garland to the U.S. Supreme Court could have dire consequences. At an event hosted by the Pittsburgh Lawyer Chapter of the American Constitution Society for Law, Craig Green, a law professor at Temple University Beasley School of Law and former clerk to Garland said,  "This is the first time in history the Senate would defeat a nominee with literally no action at all. In the words of the presumptive Republican nominee, 'delay, delay delay.' And they would do so for the worst reason imaginable: because they can."

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PHOTO COURTESY OF LOUIS STEIN
Photo courtesy of Louis Stein
5. barebones productions' "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" is in its final weekend of performances. The remaining performances are at 8 p.m. tonight and Saturday, at the New Hazlett Theater. Here’s CP contributor Stuart Sheppard’s review of the barebones production.

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This week in photo essays:

click to enlarge PHOTO BY LUKE THOR TRAVIS
Photo by Luke Thor Travis
Thousands of runners filled Pittsburgh streets this Sunday for the annual Dick’s Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon. CP's new summer photo intern, Luke Thor Travis, documented the determined runners and the wacky spectator signs, like the one that read, “Run like there’s a hot guy in front of you and a creepy one behind you!!! :).”

PHOTO BY STEEL CITY GRAMMERS INSTAGRAM COLLECTIVE
Photo by Steel City Grammers Instagram collective
We once again teamed up with the Instagram collective @SteelCityGrammers to capture the scenes of another Pittsburgh neighborhood — this time, Polish Hill. See all the photos of Pittsburgh's historic Polish Hill and other neighborhoods we've explored with the Instagrammers.

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On our podcast:

CP FILE PHOTO BY THEO SCHWARZ
CP File Photo by Theo Schwarz
This week on the City Paper podcast, self-proclaimed wrestling nerds editor Charlie Deitch and stand-up comic and radio personality Mike Wysocki talk to Fleck and Feeny, the owners of Pittsburgh’s Code Red Wrestling.

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From the pages of our print edition:

This week City Paper explored issues surrounding the LGBTQ community. Staff writer Rebecca Nuttall looked at policies that schools in the Pittsburgh area are enacting to ensure protections for transgender students.  Meanwhile, staff writer Ryan Deto asks legislators what's holding up Pennsylvania's LGBT Fairness Act, a statewide nondiscrimination law. 

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This week in City Paper history:
Broadway, film and television actor Anthony Rapp isn’t a Pittsburgher. But the talented actor — a star from the original cast of the musical and film version of Rent (and who played Daryl Coopersmith in Adventures in Babysitting, a film beloved by Gen-Xers everywhere) — is no stranger to performing here, particularly at City Theatre. Rapp turned heads in 2003 when he took on the title role in Hedwig and the Angry Inch and turned in a nationally acclaimed performance. A year later, he returned to the venue to work on his brother Adam’s play Gompers. Then in 2012, Rapp returned to City Theatre to portray Andy Warhol in Pop!, a musical about the day Warhol was shot. All great credentials, but why is this a moment in CP history? Because Rapp was featured on the cover of Issue 18 in 2004 and then again in issue 18 in 2012. Need more proof of the stars aligning? Further research shows that Adam Rapp debuted his new play, Blackbird, at City Theatre in 2002. No Rapp on the cover this time, but the company’s artistic director, Tracy Brigden, was. Wanna take a wild guess what issue number that was? Consider your mind blown! Read more about what happened this week in City Paper history.

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Friday, April 29, 2016

Posted By on Fri, Apr 29, 2016 at 11:52 AM

Here's what went down in Pittsburgh and the region this week:

If you live under a rock, maybe you've kept yourself away from this in-your-face political season. The Pennsylvania primary was last Tuesday, and leading up to it, the presidential candidates made their last pleas to Western Pennsylvanians.



Over the weekend, Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz stopped by Gateway High School in Monroeville to remind everyone that does not believe in "little girls" being in bathrooms with "grown men."



On Monday, the day before the primary, Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders gave young people a talkin' to at the University of Pittsburgh's Fitzgerald Field House about political participation and why college debt in the U.S. is unfair.



On primary day, Braddock Mayor and U.S. Senate candidate John Fetterman spoke to media outside of his Braddock polling place, saying he was disappointed by the millions the Democratic party poured into fellow U.S. Senate candidate Katie McGinty's campaign. "You would expect that from the Republicans to pour [money] into a race but not your own party."


PHOTO BY AARON WARNICK
Photo by Aaron Warnick
By now, we all know what went down in Pa.'s primary (although if you want to re-live what happened throughout the day, check out our live Pa. primary blog), but editor Charlie Deitch has this postmortem on why votes went the way they did on Tuesday. (Spoiler alert if you've been living under that rock: Clinton and Trump won Pa.; Zappala lost the Pa. Attorney General Dem nod to Shapiro; and McGinty won the U.S. Senate Democratic primary, but Fetterman did much better than expected.)

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This week, the Affordable Housing Task Force delivered its recommendations to Pittsburgh City Council, which include creating an affordable housing trust fund of $10 million and utilizing incentive-based inclusionary zoning.

Ronell Guy of the Northside Coalition for Fair Housing speaks critically of the city's Affordable Housing Task Force's new recommendations. - PHOTO BY RYAN DETO
Photo by Ryan Deto
Ronell Guy of the Northside Coalition for Fair Housing speaks critically of the city's Affordable Housing Task Force's new recommendations.
CP''s Ryan Deto covered the press conference held outside of Pittsburgh City Council chambers before the hearing, where most of the 60 attendees challenged some of the draft recommendations. “They did not come up with one new suggestion. We knew to do this 20 years ago,” Guy said. “There is no reason to continue to study. Just get it done.” Read more.


PHOTO BY RYAN DETO
Photo by Ryan Deto
CP's Rebecca Nuttall covered the hearing where City Council received an update on the work of the task force, which has met more than 30 times since it was created last year. "One of the things that is critical to any kind of affordable-housing effort in the city is a dedicated source of funds to pay for it," said task force co-chair Raymond Gastil, on the suggestion to develop a trust fund. In addition to the trust fund and incentive-based inclusionary zoning, the task force also recommended expanding utilization of the Low Income Housing Tax Credit.

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The Port Authority Board of Allegheny County voted unanimously this week to pass new fare changes that will take place in 2017. New changes would incentivize use of the ConnectCard and rid the system of higher fares for areas farther away from Downtown, among other changes. Read more about the changes here.

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Despite heated political battles, life goes on in the arts and nightlife realms. 


The iconic Lava Lounge on Pittsburgh's South Side is marking its final weekend, with events this Friday and Saturday. Owners Steve Zumoff and Scott Kramer, who opened the Lava Lounge in 1996, plan to reopen it in May as Monster, an LGBTQ-friendly bar.


click to enlarge PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN ALTDORFER
Photo courtesy of John Altdorfer
This weekend marks the final performances of Quantum Theatre's production of Master Builder. The production takes place on the ninth floor of Building Two of Nova Place on the North Side (formerly Allegheny Center), offering interesting views of the city, which arts editor Bill O'Driscoll writes is "alone is worth half the price of admission."  Read CP contributor Stuart Sheppard's review here.

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On our podcast:

PHOTO BY ASHLEY MURRAY
Photo by Ashley Murray
This week on the City Paper podcast, our panel, featuring editor Charlie Deitch, multimedia editor Ashley Murray and staff writer Ryan Deto, breakdown what happened on primary day in Pennsylvania. The conversation gets a little crazy, but Charlie keeps order with a gavel he brought to the studio. (Really, it was a gift from when he was a courts reporter back in the day.)

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On our music blog:

Each week on our FFW music blog, we make a Spotify playlist containing tracks from artists mentioned in the current music section. Listen below!


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From the pages of our print edition:

PHOTO BY AARON WARNICK
Photo by Aaron Warnick
This week, freelance contributor Melinda Nanovsky writes about a technique called “tactile target-training" — a major advancement used at zoos around the country — that was developed at the Pittsburgh Zoo & Aquarium. The technique allows scientists and aquarists to give individualized and efficient care to each creature in the aquarium.

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This week in City Paper history:


This week last year, we recreated four iconic album covers starring local kids for our 2015 music issue. The photo shoots were hilarious and endearing, and we documented the making of each cover in our behind-the-scenes video. Two covers were initially approved. However, after the four possible cover shots came in from photographers Sarah Wilson, John Colombo, Renee Rosensteel and Heather Mull, art director Lisa Cunningham made a last-minute push, just a few days before the paper was printed, to include all of them. While it was a bit of a logistical nightmare for our circulation manager and drivers, the end result was one for the ages. Read here for more stories from this week in City Paper history.

Editor's note: This post was updated at 2:27 p.m.

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Friday, April 22, 2016

Posted By on Fri, Apr 22, 2016 at 5:42 PM

Here's what went down in Pittsburgh:

1. Gov. Tom Wolf signed a medical-marijuana bill into law on Sunday, ending a seven-year struggle for advocates and Pa. legislators. "We stopped being Democrats and started being caregivers. We stopped being Republicans and started being patients. We stopped being politicians and started being human beings," said Democratic state Sen. Daylin Leach, champion of the bill, in his remarks during the bill's signing ceremony.

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2. The Indian Graduate Student Associate at the University of Pittsburgh sponsored a Holi - the Hindu spring festival - event in Schenley Park this past weekend. See our slideshow of the colorful event above.

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3. Presidential candidate and Ohio Gov. John Kasich stopped in Pittsburgh on his food-tour-of-a-campaign for an awkward fish-sandwich session at The Original Oyster House in Downtown's Market Square. Quote of the day: "All I wanted to do was come and have a fish sandwich, bro."



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4. Former President Bill Clinton
, campaigning for his wife and Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, visited the Pittsburgh Federation of Teachers' building in the South Side this week. In his stump speech, the country’s 42nd president spoke about health care, education, college loans and inequality to the crowd of more than 150. Notably, staffer Ryan Deto writes that former President Clinton showed an understanding of the Keystone State that seemed to be lacking among other candidates who recently visited Pittsburgh, particularly presidential candidate Donald Trump who promised the return of steel to Western Pa. and spoke about Penn State football coach Joe Paterno in a confusing context.

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5. Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream co-founders campaigned for presidential candidate Bernie Sanders in Pittsburgh. Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield scooped free "Bernie's Yearning" sundaes to a crowd of a couple hundred people in Downtown's Market Square. "It's essentially mint chocolate-chip ice cream, except somehow or other, all the chips have risen to the top. ... And that represents all the money that's been generated since the end of the recession that's gone to the top 1 percent," Greenfield explained the "Bernie's Yearning" ice-cream concept to the crowd. Cohen and Greenfield said they've been Vermont Sen. Sanders' constituents for more than 30 years.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST
Photo courtesy of Pittsburgh Cultural Trust

6.  The Three Rivers Arts Fest announced new features for its upcoming 57th annual incarnation, which will happen June 3-12. The Pittsburgh Technology Council’s CREATE Festival will be more integrated into the TRAF, and there will also be more opportunity for food-truck fun. The fest will include new sensory-friendly “breakout areas” for people on the autism spectrum, as well as a feeding room for parents and kids. 

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On our podcast:


This week on the City Paper podcast, producer Ashley Murray sends us an audio postcard from the Donald Trump madness in Pittsburgh last week. Our panel, featuring editor Charlie Deitch and music editor Margaret Welsh, talks City Paper music issue. And, food adventurist Celine Roberts heads to the mountains to learn the time-honored tradition of salt-rising bread at Rising Creek Bakery. 

See the video of our podcast panel discussion below:



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On our political blogs:


City Paper reached out to the three Democratic candidates for U.S. Senate — Braddock Mayor John Fetterman, former Pa. environmental secretary Katie McGinty, and retired Navy Admiral and former U.S. Rep. Joe Sestak — for their thoughts on the controversial campaign ruling Citizens United. Read what they had to say about it.

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On our music blog:

Every week on our FFW music blog, we make a Spotify playlist containing tracks from artists mentioned in the current music section and — for this week at least — some of the artists we checked out during our weekend of Pittsburgh music for our special Music Issue. Listen below.


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From the pages of our print edition:


LIVE MUSIC IN PITTSBURGH (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT): KING OF THE BURGH (PHOTO BY AARON WARNICK), THE LOPEZ (PHOTO BY SARAH WILSON), THE WIZ (PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL) AND RAVE AND CHILL TEKKO AFTER-PARTY (PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO)
Live music in Pittsburgh (clockwise from top left): King of the Burgh (photo by Aaron Warnick), The Lopez (photo by Sarah Wilson), The Wiz (photo by Renee Rosensteel) and Rave and Chill Tekko After-Party (photo by John Colombo)
This week is our Music Issue, and we wanted to show our readers the range of music that could be enjoyed in one weekend in Pittsburgh. From Fri., April 8 through Sun., April 10, our staff reported from rocks shows, rap battles, church services and high school musicals. (On of our writers even reported the musical selections of her Lyft drivers throughout the weekend.) We hope you enjoy our piece entitled "Three Days in the Life: A weekend spent exploring Pittsburgh’s musical offerings." Now get out there this weekend. There's a lot happening. 

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This week in City Paper history:


After a fast start, the 2016 Pirates have cooled off a little. But remember, everything’s going to be fine. Or at least, it won’t be as horrible as the bad ol’ days between 1992 and 2013. To remind you of that, we go back to April 17, 1997, and a story written by John Enrietto, a regular guru of Pirates baseball, about the team’s new strategy. Despite the Pirates marketing director’s claims that the team was “selling baseball, not gimmicks,” it was obvious that the focus was on non-baseball premiums instead of actual players. That year, the team gave away fishing rods, mouse pads and dog tags, and held events like senior bingo day. Hell, it even introduced a fancy red-billed cap. If only they would have introduced a starting pitcher who we could remember today. For more stories from this week in City Paper history, see here.

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Friday, April 15, 2016

Posted By on Fri, Apr 15, 2016 at 11:57 AM

What went down in Pittsburgh this week:


1. Presidential candidate
Donald Trump visited Pittsburgh and, in his speech, name dropped "Big Ben", asked the crowd about Joe Paterno and promised to bring steel back to Western Pennsylvania. City Paper kept a live blog of events in Oakland, the rally in the Convention Center and the protests in Downtown. Also, see our photos from the day through the lens of photographers Renee Rosensteel and Aaron Warnick.



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click to enlarge PHOTO BY REBECCA NUTTALL
Photo by Rebecca Nuttall
2. Equal Pay Day, the day in April that signifies the point at which a woman's earnings finally catch up with a man's earnings from the previous year, was marked with a rally in Pittsburgh's Market Square this past Tuesday. In Southwest Pennsylvania, women make an average of 75 cents on the dollar. According to the Women and Girls Foundation. "This year, we've worked together to advance the causes of the Fight for $15, so we can raise the minimum wage in the state," said Heather Arnet, CEO of the Women and Girls Foundation who hosted the rally. "And we are working together to ensure all of us have paid family leave, so we don't have to move to New York or California to ensure we can take care of our children, parents or sick spouses."

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PHOTO BY REBECCA NUTTALL
Photo by Rebecca Nuttall
3. This week, misdemeanor charges were dismissed against two teens arrested following an incident at the Wood Street T station incident in Downtown Pittsburgh last December. The incident received considerable local media attention because of video of a Pittsburgh Police officer's conduct captured by City Paper staff writer Ryan Deto. (That incident is currently under investigation by the Citizens Police Review Board and the Pittsburgh Police Bureau’s internal investigation office.)

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click to enlarge PHOTO BY REBECCA NUTTALL
Photo by Rebecca Nuttall
4. Racial bias can form during early childhood and needs to be addressed during early education, according to a University of Pittsburgh study.  The report, Understanding PRIDE in Pittsburgh, focused on African-American children ages 3-6. "By age 3, children are easily sorting people into categories," said Aisha White, one of the report's authors. "Parents are often surprised by the things kids pick up and absorb from the larger society."

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On our podcast:

PHOTO COURTESY OF SABREEN KADHIM
Photo courtesy of Sabreen Kadhim
This week on the City Paper podcast, producer Ashley Murray sends an audio postcard from Hillary Clinton’s recent Pittsburgh visit, and she interviews Iraqi journalist and poet Sabreen Kadhim. Our panel, featuring editor Charlie Deitch and staff writers Rebecca Nuttall and Ryan Deto, talks City Paper election guide and about big races — including the U.S. Senate and Attorney General races — in Pennsylvania that are receiving less attention. And, food adventurist Celine Roberts learns how to be a fishmonger at Penn Avenue Fish Company.

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On Lynn Cullen Live:

click to enlarge PHOTO BY AARON WARNICK
Photo by Aaron Warnick
Did you miss Lynn Cullen's recap of the Democratic debate and Trump's visit to Pittsburgh? Catch up on this week's shows on Lynn Cullen's page on the City Paper website.

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On our music blog:


Each week on our FFW music blog, we make a Spotify playlist containing tracks from artists mentioned in the current music section. Listen below!



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Behind the scenes:

COVER ILLUSTRATION AND SELF-PORTRAIT BY VINCE DORSE
Cover illustration and self-portrait by Vince Dorse

Our Election Issue cover this week — featuring presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders throwing balls at Donald Trump in a dunk tank — garnered a lot of attention, especially because the day it dropped, Trump arrived in Pittsburgh. Read a Q&A with illustrator Vince Dorse about the creation of this cover, as well as past covers he's designed for City Paper.

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From the pages of our print edition:


PHOTO BY DAVE NICHOLS
Photo by Dave Nichols
This week, freelance writer Cumi Ikeda looks at the comedy-podcast scene in Pittsburgh. Ikeda talks with standup comics Ed Bailey, Day Bracey and Aaron Kleiber, who host, respectively, the podcasts Drinking Partners and Grown Dad Business.

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This week in
City Paper history:


On Tue., April 10, 2012, one hour before City Paper was scheduled to print its primary election guide, Pennsylvania’s favorite conservative, Rick Santorum, announced he was suspending his presidential campaign. For a liberal alt-weekly that spent years wishing he’d just go away, one might think this was great news. But, sitting at the printer, ready to go to press, was that week’s cover: Rick Santorum, illustrated as a zombie by local artist Frank Harris. The cover language? “HE’S B-A-A-A-CK! Is he pro-life or just undead? Either way, Pennsylvanians may have to kill Rick Santorum’s political career again.” A quick call to the printer followed. “STOP THE PRESSES!” With no time to find new cover art, then-editor Chris Potter changed the text to “IT’S (NOT) ALIVE! Do we have to wait until 2016 to ruin his career again?” Yup. Read more about what happened this week in City Paper history.

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Friday, April 8, 2016

Posted By on Fri, Apr 8, 2016 at 3:10 PM

Here's what went down in Pittsburgh:


1. Presidential candidate
Hillary Clinton spoke to roughly 2,000 people at the Skibo Gymnasium on Pittsburgh's Carnegie Mellon University campus. Among the topics she touched on, equal pay, the economy, national security and climate change featured prominently. “Well I bet Carnegie Mellon could help teach them about science,” she said to the crowd of students in one particularly biting line regarding Republicans not embracing climate-change science.



2. Vice President Joe Biden visited the University of Pittsburgh to speak about the issue of campus sexual assault.  The stop was one of several university visits as part of the national It's On Us Week of Action. "You'd think the last place you'd have to worry about dropping your beautiful son or daughter off would be at a college campus. It should be the safest place in the world," Biden said.

click to enlarge PHOTO COURTESY OF PA. AUDITOR GENERAL
Photo courtesy of Pa. Auditor General
3. On April 6, Pennsylvania Auditor General Eugene DePasquale told City Paper that his office is "very likely" going to conduct a forensic audit of the Intergovernmental Cooperation Authority, the city of Pittsburgh's besieged financial watchdog. And, DePasquale said, the audit won't just look at the ICA's actions, but also the legislation that authorized it in 2004. The auditor general was asked by several Democratic state legislators as well as Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peuto to conduct the audit in light of a Pittsburgh Tribune Review investigation that found records at the agency had been destroyed over the years. DePasquale conducted an audit previously and noticed record keeping issues, but that wasn't the original focus of his probe then. "When we went in last time, it was to try and help resolve the dispute over gaming money," DePasquale said. "We did note that they weren't following good record-retention practices, and we put that in our report and said they should change that. These allegations take that to a whole new level. The agency needs to change because this is unacceptable behavior if the allegations are correct. If we go again, and let me tell you, it's very likely that we will, our efforts will go well beyond just helping with the gaming money. What's going on there is either poor record-keeping or destruction of records. Either way, it's bad."

PHOTO COURTESY OF PITTSBURGH PUBLIC THEATER
Photo courtesy of Pittsburgh Public Theater
4. Pulitzer-winner Disgraced is in its last weekend at the Pittsburgh Public Theater. This is the local premiere for Ayad Akhtar’s show, which is about Islam, Islamophobia, race, art and more in a post-9/11 New York. In his review this week, City Paper arts editor Bill O'Driscoll wrote, "The show’s got a dozen juicy themes and 50 chewy ideas."

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On the podcast:

PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL
Photo by Renee Rosensteel
This week on the City Paper podcast, producer Ashley Murray sends an audio postcard from the Bernie Sanders rally in Pittsburgh. On our panel, editor Charlie Deitch answers your question about Eagle Media’s purchase of the City Paper; freelance photographer Renee Rosensteel talks about capturing photos at huge campaign rallies; and Ashley Murray tells her story of getting yelled at by the Secret Service. Then, booze columnist Celine Roberts takes us to Keystone Hops Farm where delicious beer begins.

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On our political blogs:


The gloves finally came off in the Democratic contest for Pennsylvania’s open U.S. Senate seat during a Tuesday night debate on WTAE-TV. While some similarities were still evident between Braddock Mayor John Fetterman, Gov. Tom Wolf’s former chief of staff Katie McGinty and former U.S. Rep. Joe Sestak, the candidates scuffled over past legislation, fracking and the minimum wage.

CP FILE PHOTO BY MIKE SCHWARZ
CP file photo by Mike Schwarz
Pittsburgh city councilor Dan Gilman announced this week that two private lactation rooms are now available in city buildings — this coming more than a year after he proposed them. The lactation room legislation was part of a package of bills aimed at improving working conditions for pregnant women and nursing mothers.

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On our music blog:

Every week on our FFW music blog, we make a Spotify playlist containing tracks from artists mentioned in the current music section and included in our concert listings. Listen below!


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From the pages of our print edition:


Photographer Renee Rosensteel's photo of Bernie Sanders in Pittsburgh last week ran on our cover. Editor Charlie Deitch questions whether the sizable turnout for the Vermont Senator's rally at the David Lawrence Convention Center will translate into votes on the April 26 Pennsylvania primary.

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This week in City Paper history:


In April 2009, writer Adam Fleming took a look at the Pittsburgh Pirates’ miserable losing streak and asked the question that fans asked every year: “Is this the season when things start to go right?” There were a lot of interesting things about this particular piece. There was also a story behind the story. The illustration by Mario Zucca, which featured the racing Pierogies mourning the death of the Pirate Parrot, was originally supposed to be the cover. On the Saturday before the issue was to hit the streets, however, three Pittsburgh Police officers were killed in a shooting at a Stanton Heights home. After a brief discussion, then-editor Chris Potter decided that featuring baseball on the cover in what was also a funeral depiction was in very bad taste. Instead the cover featured a photo of the city’s police memorial on the North Side. Read more stories that ran this week in City Paper history.

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Friday, April 1, 2016

Posted By on Fri, Apr 1, 2016 at 5:01 PM

Here's what went down in Pittsburgh this week:

Video by Ashley Murray
1. Presidential candidate and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders spoke to thousands of supporters at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center ahead of the Pennsylvania primary. “With your support and a large turnout, we’re going to win on April 26. Not only can we win the primary, but we can win with your help in the general,” Sanders said to the crowd. Sanders spoke on his opposition to current trade agreements and the Trans-Pacific Partnership, as well as about fair pay and rebuilding America's inner cities. Read our full coverage and see our photo slideshow from the day.

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click to enlarge PHOTO BY REBECCA NUTTALL
Photo by Rebecca Nuttall

2. Protesting the Steelers' firing of 15 union security guards, the Service Employees International 32BJ Union and other labor and faith-based organizations gathered outside of Heinz Field on Friday. "We just found out [about the firing] Tuesday," said security worker William Chernosky. "Not only does this put us out of work, it hurts our families, our children and grandchildren. And, it hurts the local economy."  The Steelers did not respond to City Paper by press time.

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PHOTO BY RYAN DETO
Photo by Ryan Deto
3. East Liberty residents and the advocacy organization ACTION United held a press conference this week to remind city officials of the ongoing affordable-housing issue. In light of the 90-day eviction notices given to East Liberty residents living in the Penn Plaza apartments this past July, the group is calling for the city to require landlords provide at least 18 months notice in situations similar to Penn Plaza. "You cannot put people out in the streets in 90 days, especially if they are disabled and seniors," said Angel Gober, an ACTION United community organizer.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF GAIL L. MANKER
Photo courtesy of Gail L. Manker
4. Pittsburgh Playwrights' Miss Julie, Clarissa and John is in its last weekend of performances. Critics have been loving the Mark Clayton Southers original play, which was inspired by a 19th-century work about an illicit affair between a rich woman and her father’s top servant. However, Southers sets the action in Virginia, and makes the servant a freed former African-American slave. CP's theater critic Ted Hoover wrote in his review, "Southers has taken the issues of class and power and blown them through the roof."

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On our podcast:




This week on the City Paper podcast, we’re joined by editor Charlie Deitch, comedian Mike Wysocki and Pittsburgh Pirates super-fan Demitrius “Fake Pedro” Thorn to talk about our Pirates Preview issue (see a video of our panel discussion). Then, booze columnist Celine Roberts takes us on a fool’s wine adventure. Finally, host Alex Gordon gets in touch with actor and comedian Josh Fadem, who’s made appearances on Better Call Saul and 30 Rock, among other productions. Alex just wants to chat, and Josh Fadem wants to know why.

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On our music blog:


Each week on our FFW music blog, we make a Spotify playlist containing tracks from artists mentioned in the current music section. Experience the paper without any of that tiresome reading!

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On our political blog:

OFFICIAL WHITE HOUSE PORTRAIT FROM WHITEHOUSE.GOV
Official White House portrait from whitehouse.gov
President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden handed down some high-profile endorsements to former Pennsylvania environmental secretary and Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Katie McGinty and Democratic Pennsylvania Attorney General candidate Josh Shapiro. "Katie is a true champion," Obama said in press release endorsing her. "... She spent her entire career working to promote clean energy and combat climate change, and worked closely with my administration to implement the Affordable Care Act and expand Medicaid coverage to more than 500,000 Pennsylvanians."  Meanwhile, Nick Field, managing editor of the website PoliticsPA, called Obama's weighing in on the state's Democratic Attorney General primary "an uncommon step."

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Behind the scenes:


Read our conversation
with Joshua Gragg, illustrator of this week's Pirates Preview cover featuring an illustration of Jung Ho Kang.  Gragg talks about his love for doing illustrations of celebrities; how Braddock Mayor and U.S. Senate candidate John Fetterman shared Gragg's illustration of him on Instagram; and who his favorite Buccos player is.

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From the pages of our print edition:

PHOTOS BY CHARLIE DEITCH
Photos by Charlie Deitch
In our Pirates Preview issue, editor Charlie Deitch lists four reasons the Pittsburgh Pirates are headed toward salvation in 2016 and four reasons they’re headed toward damnation. He explores scenarios on the mound, in the field, at the plate and in the division.
 
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This week in City Paper history:


At the time City Paper wrote this story, Jamie Lynn Stickle had been dead only about a year. In February, 2002, she was found burned to death in her Jeep, which was parked at a local scrapyard. Her apartment and other clues indicated there was a struggle, but the cause of death was ruled undetermined because she had been so badly burned. Stickle worked as a bartender at several LGBT clubs over the years and was active in raising money for programs in the LGBT community. Stickle’s mother said what caused her the most pain was not “knowing why they did it and how she died. I honestly can’t get answers from anybody.” The case still remains unsolved; anyone with information can call the city’s homicide squad at 412-323-7161. (March 12, 2003) Read more City Paper history here.

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Friday, March 25, 2016

Posted By on Fri, Mar 25, 2016 at 6:00 AM

Here's what's happening in Pittsburgh:


1. Voter registration
for the Pennsylvania primary is getting down to the wire. In order to vote as a Democrat or Republican (remember, Pa. has closed a closed primary, sorry independents) on April 26, residents must register by this Mon., March 28. Aside from the presidential primary candidates, residents will be voting for party nominees for Pa. Attorney General, a Democratic nominee to face incumbent U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey, and several state House seats.

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click to enlarge PHOTO BY RYAN DETO
Photo by Ryan Deto
2. Hundreds gathered to mourn the deaths of victims killed in the March 9 mass shooting in Wilkinsburg. A funeral for three of the five victims — Jerry Shelton, Brittany Powell and Chanetta Powell — called for an end to the violence and a new peaceful movement in the borough just east of Pittsburgh. “We as a community can do something about these senseless killings that have plagued our community,” said Rev. Maurice Trent of St. Clair's Lighthouse Cathedral, where the funerals were held. “No longer can we be a blind, deaf and dumb community. We will no longer turn a blind eye to what we see and hear.”

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click to enlarge PHOTO BY REBECCA NUTTTALL
Photo by Rebecca Nutttall
3. Complaints about police conduct have significantly decreased according to a City of Pittsburgh's Law Department. Lawsuits filed against the City of Pittsburgh have decreased by 50 percent in the last two years, while the number of complaints filed against police officers also decreased over the last two years and is down by 43 percent. At a press conference this week, Mayor Bill Peduto attributed the decrease to his administration moving the Office of Municipal Investigations to under the Law Department, and to Pittsburgh Police Chief Cameron McLay's leadership.

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PHOTO BY AARON WARNICK
Photo by Aaron Warnick
4. Democratic presidential candidate and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders opened a campaign office on East Carson Street in the South Side on Wednesday night. "I think we are going to have a very competitive race here in Pennsylvania. We are 50 percent through the primary, and we believe the latter 50 percent favors the senator," Sanders' Pennsylvania campaign organizer Ryan Hughes told the crowd. See our slideshow of the event and the office.

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click to enlarge PHOTO BY AARON WARNICK
Photo by Aaron Warnick
5. Democratic presidential candidate and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton opened her East Liberty campaign office on Thursday night. Many local Democratic Party leaders including Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald, U.S. Rep. Mike Doyle, state Rep. Ed Gainey, Pittsburgh City Councilor Natalia Rudiak and other party officials attended the event. "Wow. What a crowd we have here tonight. What a cross-section of Pittsburgh. Young people. Middle-aged people. People as old as me,” Fitzgerald said to the crowd of about 250. Here's our slideshow

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PHOTO COURTESY OF BECKY SULLIVAN VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS
Photo courtesy of Becky Sullivan via Wikimedia Commons
6. The Delta Foundation has named Kesha as its headliner for the 2016 Pride in the Street event. Rapper Angel Haze, who identifies as pansexual and agender, will also perform. Last year, protesters spoke out when Delta chose Iggy Azalea, reacting to what  some consider racist and homophobic language on her past social media posts. (Eventually Azalea dropped out and was replaced by performer Nick Jonas.) But protesters, including the group Roots Pride Pittsburgh, say the Delta Foundation still has a lot of work to do to include queer and transgender people of color.  

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click to enlarge PHOTO BY REBECCA NUTTALL
Photo by Rebecca Nuttall
7. Employee wages are going up at the Garfield cafe/lounge/gallery space that is Mixtape. At a press conference on Thursday, owner Katie Molchan said, "[We're] giving our employees a work environment where they can be comfortable knowing no matter what day they come in, they'll be able to pay their bills, that it's going to be a stable wage." Organizers with the Restaurant Opportunities Center of Pittsburgh also attended to discuss issues surrounding the tipped worker wage.

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PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL
Photo by Renee Rosensteel
8. The Office of Public Art's guided walking tour on Friday night will highlight public art that experiments with light. Tomorrow's Art Experiments with Light: Downtown Walking Tour covers four works in Downtown Pittsburgh — "Rivers of Light," "168 Lightbulbs," "The Puddler" and "Mix-n-Match."

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On our podcast:

PHOTO BY CHARLIE DEITCH
Photo by Charlie Deitch
This week on the City Paper podcast, editor Charlie Deitch checks in with us from Pirates Spring Training in Bradenton, Fla. City Paper’s Wedding Guide hit stands this week, so we speak to one of our models (a.k.a. staff writer Rebecca Nuttall) and wedding photographer John Colombo. And, we find out how to rent a chicken at the Farm to Table Pittsburgh conference.

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On our political blogs:


Leaders in Philadelphia's African-American community criticized the television advertisement recently released by Allegheny County District Attorney Stephen Zappala, who is running for Pennsylvania district attorney. 
"Mr. Zappala, who I have not met, uses footage of the untimely as well as unjust death of unarmed African Americans in Texas and South Carolina to make the case that he's been a leader in pursuing justice during his time as district attorney," said Rev. Marshall Mitchell of Salem Baptist Church. Mitchell and other leaders say that Zappala's involvement in the conviction of a police office who killed an unarmed black man in 1995 and his recent  plea deals to five white men involved in the assault of an African-American man shows Zappala has not held the perpetrators accountable. “Plain and simple, Zappala is trying to deceive voters,” Mitchell said.


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On our music blog:


PHOTO COURTESY OF J. ROWDEN
Photo courtesy of J. Rowden
This week’s MP3 Monday offering comes from the prolific one-man experimental rock project known as Unfinished Symphonies. Stream or download the groovy track "Uh Huh" on our FFW music blog.



Every week on our FFW music blog, we make a Spotify playlist containing tracks from artists mentioned in the current music section and included in our concert listings. Listen above!

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From the pages of our print edition:

PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO
Photo by John Colombo
This week, our Wedding Guide for 2016 hit the streets. If you didn't grab your copy yet, check out the issue here for articles on local wedding dress offerings, floral trends, delicious desserts (that aren't cake), nontraditional venues and signature cocktails.

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Behind the scenes:


We talk to local artist 
Rhonda Libbey, who has been creating City Paper covers for the past 10 years, about her latest work for us. Libbey’s cover illustration this week depicts a cute wedding scene, but she’s best known for her work in the world of science fiction and fantasy. We ask her about being an artist in Pittsburgh, what inspires her, and how she's great at depicting local politicians as horror creatures.

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This week in City Paper history:

COVER ILLUSTRATION BY JIM RUGG
Cover illustration by Jim Rugg
On March 25, 2009, City Paper looked back on the prosecutor Mary Beth Buchanan’s legacy in the waning days before the Obama administration chucked her out of office. Buchanan always said she believed in her prosecutions. She prosecuted Cyril Wecht for charges that basically amounted to misusing paper clips owned by Allegheny County. She built a case of trading prescription medications for sex against former physician Bernard Rottschaefer based on the testimony of stool pigeons who testified against the doctor for reduced sentences on drug charges; most also recanted their testimony. She also was no stranger to reaching outside of Pennsylvania for high-profile cases. She sent comedian Tommy Chong to prison for selling bongs online. But as one source told CP: “Just because she’s sincere about what she’s doing doesn’t make it noble.”



Editor's note: We've updated our list with information that has been added to our online coverage since this blog's original 6 a.m. post.

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Friday, March 18, 2016

Posted By on Fri, Mar 18, 2016 at 6:30 PM

Here's what went down in Pittsburgh and Pennsylvania news this week:

1. Medical-marijuana legislation passed the Pennsylvania State House by a vote of 149-43. The fight that has been ongoing since 2009 has cleared its biggest hurdle, and Senate Bill 3 (as the medical-marijuana bill is called) will now move to the Senate, where it most recently passed 40-7. If it's approved there, Gov. Tom Wolf is expected to sign the bill into law.

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click to enlarge PHOTO BY REBECCA NUTTALL
Photo by Rebecca Nuttall
2. Wilkinsburg residents and others from the Pittsburgh area revisited the scene of last week's mass shooting on Franklin Avenue that took the lives of five adults and one unborn child. They called for the two shooters, still at large, to come forward. 

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click to enlarge PHOTO BY CHARLIE DEITCH
Photo by Charlie Deitch
3. Pittsburgh Pirates center fielder Andrew McCutchen says that seeing former-Pirate Pedro Alvarez in a Baltimore Orioles jersey was "awkward." McCutchen told City Paper editor Charlie Deitch, who is reporting from spring training in Bradenton, Fla., this week, that "It's a game, you know, but I still felt like it was messed up because he's my friend. Before he was teammate, he was my friend."

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click to enlarge IMAGE FROM VIDEO TAKEN BY RYAN DETO
Image from video taken by Ryan Deto
4. Charges were dropped against the teen arrested in ruckus outside Downtown Pittsburgh's Wood Street T Station, and which City Paper reporter Ryan Deto caught on a video that went viral and drew scrutiny from the Citizen Police Review Board. The 16-year-old boy, Mohamed Abdalla, was originally charged with disorderly conduct. The attorney for three other teenagers arrested on the scene says that none of the charges have been dropped against his clients, including one who faces a felony charge for inciting a riot.

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5. Flint water-crisis reporter Curt Guyette, of the ACLU of Michigan's Democracy Watch blog, spoke in Pittsburgh on Tuesday night. "The driving force throughout the whole thing were the residents who refused to believe their water was safe," Guyette said. 

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click to enlarge PHOTO BY ASHLEY MURRAY
Photo by Ashley Murray
6. A breast-milk bank in Pittsburgh held its ribbon-cutting this week. The Three Rivers Mothers' Milk Bank is now supplying donated breast milk to Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Magee-Women's Hospital and all area-UPMC hospitals for medically vulnerable infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Units. "Our donors are unpaid, they are very generous women who are willing to donate milk they have beyond the needs of their own child," says Denise O'Connor, executive director of the nonprofit.

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On our podcast:

PHOTO BY ASHLEY MURRAY
Photo by Ashley Murray
This week on the City Paper podcast, host Alex Gordon talks to filmmaker John Cameron Mitchell ahead of his visit to Pittsburgh for Reel Q’s “Night of 1,000 Hedwigs.” Our panel discusses the recent violence in Wilkinsburg, and editor Charlie Deitch talks about his family’s brush with gun violence. And, staying in Wilkinsburg, columnist Celine Roberts visits a hopeful spot of economic redevelopment – Leona’s Ice Cream Sandwiches, operating in the former Smith’s Bakery.

On our political blogs:


On our PolitiCrap blog, we report on Democratic U.S. Senate candidate and former U.S. Rep. Joe Sestak's new TV ad; that current U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey's chosen presidential candidate — Florida Sen. Marco Rubio — has dropped out; and that Democratic State House Rep. Adam Ravenstahl, of Summer Hill, recently had his path fully cleared to re-election, thanks in large part to his mother. 

On our music blog:


Each week on our FFW blog, we create a Spotify playlist containing tracks from artists mentioned in the current music section and included in our concert listings.

From the pages of our print edition:


This week, staff writer Rebecca Nuttall writes about the Pittsburgh Sociable City plan, which aims to manage the city's nightlife and is being piloted in the South Side. Among city officials' goals: parking enforcement, crowd control and crime reduction.

This week in City Paper history:

Back in 2008, Charlie Deitch went behind the scenes of Education Management Corp. and its flagship school, The Art Institute of Pittsburgh. The story focused on the high price of the educational and financial difficulties of students saddled with massive debt and an education that couldn’t even get them a job earning enough money to pay back their loans. Since then, the company has had massive layoffs, settled a Department of Justice lawsuit for $96 million and watched its stock price drop from $30 a share to roughly 9 cents a share today.


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