BLOGH: City Paper's Blog |
Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Posted By on Wed, Oct 31, 2018 at 3:34 PM

click to enlarge Stronger Than Hate: A Concert with Kesha - PHOTO: THE DELTA FOUNDATION OF PITTSBURGH
Photo: The Delta Foundation of Pittsburgh
Stronger Than Hate: A Concert with Kesha

The Delta Foundation of Pittsburgh’s Sat., Nov. 3 event “Countdown 2 Vote" with headliner Kesha is now “Stronger Than Hate: A Concert with Kesha.”

In the aftermath of the shooting that took place on Saturday at the Tree of Life synagogue in Squirrel Hill, the foundation, along with Kesha and her management team, made the decision to change the name and donate proceeds to the Jewish Federation's Our Victims of Terror fund.

“We believe that now is the time to bring all of Pittsburgh's LGBT community, businesses, organizations, and our allies together as one and support our friends in the Jewish community,” said Christine Bryan, director of marketing and development of the Delta Foundation, in an email to Pittsburgh City Paper.

A nonprofit advocacy organization for the LGBT community, The Delta Foundation of Pittsburgh organizes the annual Pittsburgh Pride festival. Originally, the concert was meant to encourage people to get out and vote during the upcoming Nov. 6 midterm elections. Kesha was chosen because she is an advocate for the support of the LGBT community and is outspoken on issues like gun control.


Stronger Than Hate: A Concert with Kesha. 6 p.m. Sat., Nov. 3. Liberty Avenue between Ninth and 10th streets, Downtown. $59-139.


 The event will include full-service bars and numerous food options.



Tags: , , , , , ,

Tuesday, October 30, 2018

Posted By on Tue, Oct 30, 2018 at 2:51 PM

click to enlarge Elijah Malcomb, Joseph Morales, Kyle Scatliffe, Fergie L. Philippe and Company - PHOTO: JOAN MARCUS
Photo: Joan Marcus
Elijah Malcomb, Joseph Morales, Kyle Scatliffe, Fergie L. Philippe and Company

Local fans of HAMILTON: An American Musical have been waiting for the announcement for some time: tickets for the tour’s Pittsburgh stop go on sale Mon., Nov. 5 at 9 a.m. 

If you've somehow missed the headlines for the past three years, HAMILTON is the story of Alexander Hamilton, an immigrant from the West Indies who rose to prominence during the Revolutionary War and was the nation’s first Treasury Secretary. Telling American history by blending hip hop, jazz, blues, showtunes. and R&B, the producers describe the show as “the story of America then, as told by America now.” It was nominated for a record-setting 16 Tony Awards in 2016. 

HAMILTON’s stay in Pittsburgh will consist of 32 performances from Jan. 1 through Jan. 27, 2019 at the Benedum Center. General tickets for the performances range from $81-190, with a select number of premium seats available for $420. 

Tags: , , , ,

Posted By on Tue, Oct 30, 2018 at 1:34 PM

click to enlarge Sylvan and Bernice Simon - PHOTO COURTESY THE SIMON FAMILY
Photo courtesy the Simon family
Sylvan and Bernice Simon
Alleged shooter Robert Bowers killed 11 people at the Tree of Life synagogue on Saturday in Squirrel Hill. The congregants were attending a bris, and among the victims were Bernice and Sylvan Simon.

Many family members of the victims have remained quiet in their time of mourning. This mass shooting is believed to the deadliest attack on the Jewish community in the history of the United States, according to the Anti-Defamation League.

Bernice and Sylvan Simon were 84 and 86 years old respectively. They were married at Tree of Life 62 years ago. Their children wanted to share their feelings about the death of Bernice and Sylvan. A statement from the children was sent to City Paper from KDKA, who asked CP to share it here:

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Monday, October 29, 2018

What issues are igniting Republican and Democratic bases?

Posted on Mon, Oct 29, 2018 at 2:54 PM

click to enlarge Senior Writer Ryan Deto
Senior Writer Ryan Deto

Listen to the Pittsburgh City Podcast as Senior Writer Ryan Deto dives deep into local races and the policies that should drive voters' decision-making.


Pittsburgh City Podcast

Sunday, October 28, 2018

Posted By on Sun, Oct 28, 2018 at 6:09 PM

click to enlarge Antonio Brown hugs a fan on the sidelines prior to kickoff against the Cleveland Browns at Heinz Field. - CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM
CP Photo: Jared Wickerham
Antonio Brown hugs a fan on the sidelines prior to kickoff against the Cleveland Browns at Heinz Field.
"We need love, not hate. And we need that giant hug..."

Those were the words of Jeff Finkelstein, President/CEO of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh during today's vigil at Soldiers & Sailors in the Oakland neighborhood of Pittsburgh. He spoke just after the Pittsburgh Steelers defeated the Cleveland Browns 33-18 at Heinz Field.

Sports offer us a healthy, temporary distraction from life during times like these. It’s not for everyone. We all have our own ways of dealing with obstacles in front of us, many of which are emotional in nature for many Pittsburghers right now. It can also be a platform for change like what we’ve seen in recent years with Colin Kaepernick, Eric Reid, and others. But it’s many things for many people. Today, myself and approximately 68,000 people used football to help heal.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Saturday, October 27, 2018

Posted By on Sat, Oct 27, 2018 at 8:39 PM

click to enlarge Hundreds gather for a vigil in Squirrel Hill on Sat., Oct. 27, 2018. - CP PHOTO: JUSTIN MATASE
CP photo: Justin Matase
Hundreds gather for a vigil in Squirrel Hill on Sat., Oct. 27, 2018.
Crowds gathered in Pittsburgh's Squirrel Hill neighborhood tonight for a vigil following this morning's tragedy where 11 people were killed and six were injured in what is being categorized by the Anti-Defamation League as "likely the deadliest attack on the Jewish community in the history of the United States."

Tonight’s event was organized by the students of Taylor Allderdice High School and Dor Hadash, one of the congregations that meets for prayer at Squirrel Hill's Tree of Life synagogue, where the shooting occurred.

Tags: , , , , ,

Tuesday, October 23, 2018

Posted By on Tue, Oct 23, 2018 at 3:11 PM

Thirty three voting precincts have changed locations in Allegheny County since the May primary. Allegheny County sent letters to voters in affected districts notifying them of the changes. However, those letters had incorrect information.

Voters in Baldwin, Carnegie, McCandless, Mount Lebanon, Penn Hills, Pittsburgh, Plum, Shaler, Stowe, Upper St. Clair, and Wilkinsburg are affected by the letters, and a full list follows.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Monday, October 22, 2018

Posted By on Mon, Oct 22, 2018 at 4:43 PM

click to enlarge The Fab Four - PHOTO: THE FAB FOUR
Photo: The Fab Four
The Fab Four
Every Monday, CP staff writer Jordan Snowden wraps up the weekend in local and national music news with #MusicMonday. Here's what went down in the past few days.

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Friday, October 19, 2018

Posted By on Fri, Oct 19, 2018 at 2:30 PM

click to enlarge Busnegie party outside the CMOA. - PHOTO: AMANDA WALTZ
Photo: Amanda Waltz
Busnegie party outside the CMOA.
Things got loud outside of the Carnegie Museum of Art on Thursday night when Busnegie hosted a public party in the square. Giant puppets by Cheryl Capezzuti swayed as Colonel Eagleburger's Highstepping Goodtime Band energetically blasted pop hits such as “SexyBack.” Some onlookers, many of them dressed up for the special Third Thursday Carnegie International event going on inside, jumped in to dance. 
click to enlarge Giant puppets at the Busnegie party. - PHOTO: AMANDA WALTZ
Photo: Amanda Waltz
Giant puppets at the Busnegie party.


Not far from the scene, an orange construction sign bedecked in flower chains announced, with a simple piece of white printer paper, the Busnegie Museum of Art. Started by arts activist, Suzanne Werder, the project replaces ad space in the bus shelters near the CMOA at the intersection of South Craig Street and Forbes Avenue with works by local artists.

Werder came up with the idea to use transit shelters – what she calls “the most egalitarian spaces that exist in Pittsburgh” – to promote public art and, potentially, as a way to boost the careers of local artists by exposing them to art professionals visiting the Carnegie International.

“There is a paradigm that artists should just wait around for their patron in shining armor to come rescue them, but the truth is that no one is coming,” says Werder, who also serves as a teaching artist in residence with ProjectArt at the Knoxville branch of the Carnegie Library. “Instead of expecting audiences to come to us, we need to go to them. Instead of expecting someone to come and give artists opportunities, we need to create our own.”

To make Busnegie happen, Werder obtained grants to buy the ad space in the bus shelters. Now commuters are surrounded by translucent prints (think of the plastic sheets teachers used on school projectors) of works by over 30 area artists. An installation by Patrick Schmidt and a sculpture by Ryder Henry are also on display.
click to enlarge "American Gothic 2018" by Elizabeth Lana in the Busnegie Museum of Art. - PHOTO: AMANDA WALTZ
Photo: Amanda Waltz
"American Gothic 2018" by Elizabeth Lana in the Busnegie Museum of Art.
Busnegie even has a theme song: "Art is for everyone, not just a few. Art is for me and art is for you, so look at some art while you're waiting for the bus because experiencing art is for all of us."

Werder hopes Busnegie also raises awareness of little-known programs meant to increase arts access for lower-income patrons, especially for huge events like the Carnegie International, an exhibit that only comes around every three years. One such program allows residents who receive government services and have Pennsylvania ACCESS cards to attend CMOA and bring up to three people for $1 each.

“Because I am an artist, it makes me sad that so many people have never set foot in an art gallery or museum and that art isn't really a part of their lives,” says Werder. “I don't blame them, however. I think that art has marginalized itself by being elitist. People don't feel like they belong. While a $20 entrance fee to a museum is definitely worth it, it can become a financial barrier to people experiencing art. I believe that art shouldn't just be a luxury commodity. I believe that access to art is a justice issue.”

But most of all, she hopes Busnegie will brighten commutes and inspire people.

“Perhaps people will get off their phone for a minute or two, have an enjoyable time at the Busnegie and want to look at more art sometime,” she says.

Tags: , , , , ,

Monday, October 15, 2018

Posted By on Mon, Oct 15, 2018 at 2:11 PM

click to enlarge Amy Winehouse - SCREENSHOT FROM COMPLEX MUSIC TWEET
Screenshot from Complex Music Tweet
Amy Winehouse


Every Monday, CP staff writer Jordan Snowden wraps up the weekend in local and national music news with #MusicMonday. Here's what went down the past few days.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,