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  • Issue Archive for
  • Oct 18-24, 2007
  • Vol. 17, No. 42

News+Features

  • Calling Foul
  • Calling Foul

    Steelers broadcasting legend Myron Cope is best known as a football guy ... but after 15 years of watching the Pirates lose, he comes out swinging
  • Scare Tactics
  • Scare Tactics

    Cyclists are turning to ghost bikes to demonstrate the dangers they face on the roadways, but does anyone actually see them or the message?
  • Hate Zones

    In some areas of Pennsylvania, bigotry based on sexual orientation is still legally acceptable.

Pittsburgh Dining

  • Red Ginger
  • Red Ginger

    If the descriptions were all too summary -- "pork ear," "beef tendon," and the awe-inspiring "stir-fried mix of everything" -- it was pretty clear that the key was to put our faith in the kitchen, not to micromanage our meal.

Music

On Screen

  • Michael Clayton
  • Michael Clayton

    A corrupt corporation that knowingly poisons people with dangerous chemicals: That's yesterday's news and yesterday's plot. A corporate snake, Michael Clayton (Clooney) who sheds his evil skin: That's just yesterday's plot.
  • Across the Universe
  • Across the Universe

    Julie Traymor's candy-colored musical fantasia combines a TV-movie-style précis of tumultuous youth in the late 1960s with a textbook boy-meets-girl-then-loses-girl plot energized by Beatles tunes, most delivered in elaborate song-and-dance set pieces. [Capsule review]
  • Deep Water
  • Deep Water

    Lousie Osmond and Jerry Rothwell's documentary pieces together a modern-day endurance feat that spared no participants. [Capsule review]
  • Rendition
  • Rendition

    There's a lot of moral relativism -- and tricky questions -- in our actual War on Terror that are distinctly absent from this contrived, uninspired melodrama. [Capsule review]

Arts

Views

  • On the Run

    Hoping for a change in government? Try moving somewhere else.
  • Savage Love

    How much piss can one consume without getting sick?

On Stage

  • The Recruiting Officer

    Even more incisive is the undisguised glee of the upper classes in turning the less fortunate into cannon fodder, contrasted with their anguish at the thought that one of their own loved ones could end up in the army.
  • Macbeth

    Ben Greenstone's Macbeth came across not as a tragic figure, bewildered about what he is doing, but rather as an actor bewildered about the essence of what he says.

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